Parkland lawsuit spikes Smith & Wesson share prices

The Smith & Wesson booth during SHOT Show 2018 in Las Vegas. (Photo: Daniel Terrill/Guns.com)

Share prices for Smith & Wesson’s parent company, American Outdoor Brands, surged this week as details of a pending lawsuit over the Parkland shooting emerge.

Smith & Wesson’s stock increased 5 percent Thursday — the same day the Sun-Sentinel reported plaintiffs in a Broward County lawsuit against the gun maker and Sunrise Tactical Supply, a local retailer, want the presiding judge to shield them from financial ruin should the case get tossed out.

The confusion stems from Florida Statute 790.331 which prohibits government bodies from suing gun industry businesses for damages over issues involving lawful commerce. Also, the law directs the court to award “all attorney’s fees, costs and compensation for loss of income, and expenses incurred as a result of such action.”

The case, brought against Smith & Wesson by the parents of students killed attack at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School — want clarification the law doesn’t block them from collecting damages or want the judge to declare the statute unconstitutional.

The gunman at Parkland used a Smith & Wesson M&P15 rifle to murder 14 students and three teachers on Valentine’s Day. Another 15 others were injured in the attack, considered the deadliest school shooting in a decade.

The bump in share prices follows a steady increase in American Outdoor Brands share prices throughout the month — on the heels of new export rules and a promise from the president to protect the Second Amendment during his tenure.

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Iota announces drop in lead time for custom stocks

The Krux rifle stock in Sentinel Green. (Photo: Iota)

Iota Outdoors relayed to consumers that reduction time on its custom stocks has been reduced by more than 50-percent with customers now facing expected ship dates of just under three weeks.

This reduction in lead time, down from six weeks, applies to Iota custom series of Kremlin and Krux rifle stocks. Launched in 2016 and 2017, the stocks feature a composite molded and reinforced carbon fiber inlay design. The result is a durable yet lightweight build. Boasting molded-in colors and ports, the stocks offer custom-fit AirTech recoil pads by Limbsavers.

The Kremlin, pictured above, and Krux both work with Remington 700 actions. (Photo: Iota)

Available in Remington 700 or clone actions, the stocks deliver both right and left handed configurations in addition to short or long actions. The stocks serve up a few standard color options to include Citadel Grey, Sentinel Green and Gobi Tan as well as more than 20 color swatches to choose. Custom colors are available at no additional charge and do not impact lead time.

“We know that more often than not a stock can be the pacing item for a custom rifle. For a custom rifle builder, that can be the deciding factor in how many projects they can produce in a year, directly affecting their income,” Derrick Ratliff, president and founder of Iota, said in a press release. “From the very beginning, the current industry standard of eight to ten month lead times was not acceptable to us. We have worked hard to lower our lead times and we couldn’t be more happy with a two-and-a-half week lead time.”

Prices on the Kremlin and Krux rifle stocks start at $529.

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Strike Industries launches. Enhanced Low Profile Steel Gas Block

Strike Industries’ Enhanced Low Profile Steel Gas Block is a lightweight addition to AR platforms. (Photo: Strike Industries)

Strike Industries expands its accessories to include the new lightweight Enhanced Low Profile Steel Gas Block.

The gas block measures 1.18 inches in length, standing 1.40 inches tall with a weight hovering around 1.60 ounces. Finished in Black Nitride, the gas block is designed to fit neatly under any hand guard. Strike Industries says the gas block is a “must have when running extended length free float set ups.”

Created for a .750-inch diameter gas block journal, Strike Industries includes set screws and a spring pin alongside the steel gas block.

The gas block features a Black Nitride finish. (Photo: Strike Industries)

“The Strike Industries Enhanced Steel Gas block combines form and function to bring you a cost effective, robust, but lightweight gas block,” the company said in a news release. “The faceted design not only is cosmetically attractive, but the geometry adds strength where it is the most critical, while the skeletonized form factor saves weight.”

The Enhanced Low Profile Steel Gas Block is available through Strike Industries with a price tag of $29.

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Everything you never knew about the Madsen M1896 Flaadens Rekylgevær in one video

The Royal Danish Navy bought a small number of Madsen-Rasmussen rifles, making this odd weapon the first semi-auto adopted for military service.

As one would think, the surviving guns shown in the above video are in the collection of the Royal Danish Armory Museum, and Ian McCollum with Forgotten Weapons has trekked the globe to have a sit down with them — because he asks the questions about rare and little-known small arms that no one else has the courage to ask.

And if you want even more funky Danish autoloaders, check out the below about the M1888 Forsøgsrekylgevær, which preceeded the M1896 and was tested but wasn’t adopted.

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Holoson adds new LS420 Elite illuminator and laser to lineup

The LS420 illuminator and laser unit offers consumers a choice of red or green laser. (Photo: Holosun)

Holosun Technologies introduced a new illuminator and laser unit, the LS420 Elite, into its lineup of illuminators.

Featuring an IR laser paired with a white LED illuminator, the LS420 offers a visible and IR laser pointer designed to help tactical shooters and hunters accomplish their missions, especially in low lighting. Using a Titanium body, the device functions off two CR123A batteries or a single 18650 battery.

Housing a 600-lumen flashlight, the LS420 Elite utilizes a multi-functional mode selector and rear adjustable focusing knob. Granting both elevation and windage adjustments at 1/2 MOA, the unit can tackle adjustments of + or – 60 MOA.

With the choice of a red or green pointer laser, the LS420 ELite is IPX8 waterproof up to 5 meters. Tipping scales at 11 ounces, the unit measures 3.6×3.1×1.5-inches and ships with a quick detach mount.

“The LS420 Elite is a military-grade unit used by security professionals, tactical shooters and hunters, without an exorbitant military-grade price,” Holosun said in a press release.

No word yet on the exact price point.

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The need to evaluate point of impact shift on suppressors (VIDEO)

Black rifle expert Jim Zimba with Bigshooterist holds class on the difference between the point of impact and point of aim when talking about adding a can to your gun.

While some suppressor makers talk mucho smack about zero POI shift, Zimba weighs in on this by shooting five rounds unsuppressed then adds a few different cans and repeats the drill with the same ammo to see if there is a perceptible shift.

Kinda interesting if you have lingering concerns on the matter.

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Parkland families seek clarity on rule in Smith & Wesson lawsuit

Families of victims killed in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting have asked a Florida court to provide clarity on a state law before advancing a lawsuit against Smith & Wesson.

The lawsuit filed in Broward County Circuit Court asks the court to rule that the families would not face potential financial ruin by bringing a case against the gun maker’s parent company American Outdoor Brands and gun store Sunrise Tactical Supply, which sold the rifle the gunman used in the attack.

The confusion stems from Florida Statute 790.331 which prohibits government bodies from suing gun industry businesses for damages over issues involving lawful commerce. Also, the law directs the court to award “all attorney’s fees, costs and compensation for loss of income, and expenses incurred as a result of such action.”

The plaintiffs in the case — Fred and Jennifer Guttenbergs and Max Schachter — want a judge to either declare that the law does not block them from collecting damages — or to declare the law unconstitutional, The Sun-Sentinel reports.

Details about charges the families want to bring against the defendants are unclear. As of publishing this article, neither the case docket nor court documents were available through the Broward County Court’s database. But the plaintiffs and their attorneys told reporters they’re hoping their lawsuit will help undo the 2001 law.

The 19-year-old gunman who opened fire at the high school in Parkland, Florida on Feb. 14 bought a Smith & Wesson M&P15 rifle legally a year before the shooting. He used the rifle to murder 17 people — including Jaime Guttenberg and Alex Schacther — and injure 15 others.

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