Concealed Carry Corner: Life Lessons on How To Conceal Carry – Getting Started

Being able to conceal carry a gun for the first time can give new guys mixed feelings. It’s definitely exciting to be able to legally carry and take personal safety into your own hands. There can also be a lot of anxiety and mistakes when learning how to carry a gun in public. One of […]

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The VP9SK as a First Handgun

In a bit of a break from my usual writing (covering ongoing court cases and weekly deals posts for the most part) today I’m tackling something a little different. I’m going to explain my choice of a first handgun, a VP9SK. Why not a Glock? Let’s start with the elephant in the room, and get […]

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DIY Duct Tape Pocket Holster: For when you need to carry NOW

We’ve all been there. Standing in the aisle at the sporting goods store staring at the hundreds of options. Inside the waistband? Outside the Waistband? Leather or Kydex? Safariland or Galco? The options are nearly limitless. I’m talking of course, about holsters. Anyone who is looking to carry either openly or concealed is going to […]

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Retro Revolver Vibes with Kate Spade New York

Revolver

The Taurus 650 in a Can Can Concealment Garter Holster. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Every once in a while a girl just wants to shake up her style with a classic retro vibe. Away from the hustle and bustle of smartphones, tablets and tech, I opted for a simple red lip, a Taurus 650 revolver in a Can Can Concealment Garter Holster and a whole lot of attitude.

For this styled shoot, I decked out from head to toe in one of my favorite designers — Kate Spade New York. This fashionable design house creates unique, funky and often retro-looking staples perfect for any girl who likes classic with a twist. With a Kate Spade Blaire Flamingo Dress ($200) and a simple pair of black kitten heels ($20), I dressed the look up with accessories.

Concealed Carry

(Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Donning my favorites, the Kate Spade Moon River Earrings in black ($50) and Marietta Cat Eye Sunglasses in gold ($100), I added a wisp of technology in the form of the Scallop Smart Watch ($200). A girl can’t give up all her tech, after all. I finished off the look with a Kate Spade Shea Manor Place Clutch in black with my favorite shade of Urban Decay lipstick, Sheer F-Bomb ($22.50), stowed inside.

Concealed Carry

Accessories like the Marietta Sunglasses and Scalloped Smart Watch elevate the look. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Concealed Carry

Kate Spade Moon River earrings in black and Marietta Cat Eye Sunglasses. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

That wasn’t all I was packing though. I paired my classic look with a classic firearm — a revolver. In this case, I grabbed the Taurus CIA 650 ($539) and slipped it into a Can Can Concealment Garter Holster ($36.40). This holster fits around the thigh and can attach to a Can Can Concealment Garter Belt ($22) to hold it better in place. For dresses and skirts, the Can Can Concealment Garter proves to be the perfect option and a better alternative to purse carry.

Take a look into these self-portraits to see how the look came together.

Revolver

(Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Concealed Carry

The Kate Spade Blaire Flamingo Dress and Can Can Concealment holster work together to provide flawless concealment. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Concealed Carry

Soaking up some sun with a Taurus Revolver at the ready. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Revolver

Kate Spade New York Shea Manor Place Clutch and Taurus 650. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Concealed Carry

Kate Spade Marietta Cat Eye Sunglasses add some glittery flair. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Revolver

(Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Revolver

Kitten heels and revolvers? Yes, please. (Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

Concealed Carry

(Photo: Jacki Billings/Guns.com)

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Concealed Carry Corner: Carry Ammo Care – How to Maintain Your Carry Ammo

When carrying a gun daily it’s easy to get caught up in what gun is the best for concealed carry, but we sometimes forget about looking at our carry ammunition. Even in recent forums, I’ve read new conceal carriers asking why they can’t just carry a quality FMJ round instead of a hollow point. When […]

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What is the Difference Between SAO and DAO Handguns?

When I teach folks about firearms, whether it’s understanding a pistol they want to buy or teaching at the range, the biggest concern center on their handgun’s “operating system.” Like Android or Apple on a smartphone, a pistol’s OS refers to the way in which a handgun operates. In the case of firearms, this equates to the amount and types of actions the trigger performs when pulled.

SAO

SAO

The Colt 1991 1911 handgun is an example of a SAO handgun.

When society transitioned from canons — fired by fuse or lanyard pull — to hand-held long guns, gun owners needed some sort of mechanism to fire the weapon without having to use a fuse. Originally, gun owners were relegated to flintlocks or black powder weapons which required the hammers cocked and the trigger actuated to release the sear and, subsequently, the hammer to fire the weapon. To begin each firing sequence, the hammer had to be cocked because in these firearms the trigger only does a single action only – in this case, releasing the hammer to fire.

One of the early issues of this single action only, or SAO, was the hammer proved capable of actually bouncing hard enough, either while riding horseback or if sufficiently bumped, to set the primer off and inadvertently firing the pistol. As a result, most cowboys only loaded five rounds into the cylinder instead of six as a way of eliminating that possibility when riding with a revolver.

DAO

DAO

The Kahr PM9 is a double action only pistol.

After the Civil War, manufacturers released pistols which could be cocked and fired with a single pull of the trigger. Since SAO refers to just a single action – the trigger pull – these new pistols, which performed two actions, would be called double action only, or DAO. While DAO introduced a longer and heavier trigger pull, this offered an additional safety. In DAO, the hammer spring held the hammer in place so there was a smaller possibility of the hammer bouncing on the primer. The tradeoff, however, was that the trigger was longer and heavier though it was also consistent from shot to shot.

The advent of the autoloading or semi-automatic pistol moved handguns beyond the revolver era, away from slow and somewhat complex reloads that weren’t practical for combat situations against multiple attackers. Semi-automatic pistols such as the 1911 or Browning Hi-Power introduced a revolutionized approach to reloading by allowing magazines to be inserted in the grip. The slide then moves to the rear cocking the hammer. Semi-auto pistols are often carried “cocked and locked” and can be equipped with an external safety such as a thumb safety to keep the hammer from falling and ultimately firing the weapon.

SAO vs DAO

SA/DA

The Beretta Px4 Storm Compact encompasses both traits with its DA/SA design.

SAO pistols bring a clean, crisp and light trigger pull. With the advantage of accuracy. Due to the lighter trigger pull the pistol is less likely to be jerked allowing for more practical accuracy in the hands of a good shooter. The offset to this is that a trigger tuned too lightly can cause negligent discharges, unplanned multiple-taps or even run-away pistols, especially in times of stress. Another disadvantage is disengaging the manual safety when carrying an SAO pistol with a round in the chamber. This safety can be difficult to deactivate when ambushed. Perhaps the biggest issue relates to de-cocking a true SAO pistol. The hammer must be immobilized while also pulling the trigger to disengage the sear and then gently and manually lower the hammer onto the firing pin without setting off the primer and launching a bullet downrange.

Though the DAO trigger pull is longer and harder than SAO on that initial shot, follow-ups tend to be shorter and easier. DA also benefits from allowing the hammer to be decocked and then reactivated with a single pull of the trigger.

Bottom line? For many of a gun owner, there’s a special place in their hearts for a traditional SAO gun which can never be supplanted. At the end of the day, at least for me, it’s hard to beat a true blend of the two mechanisms with a DA/SA pistol for self-defense or home defense for this reason.

Check out all the handguns, rifles, and shotguns listed inside the Guns.com Vault and collection of Certified Used Firearms.

The post What is the Difference Between SAO and DAO Handguns? appeared first on Guns.com.

SIG Faceoff – SIG P365 vs X-Compact vs P365 XL

So, I’ve had a fair bit of questions about what firearm I would carry if given the chance between the regular P365 and the P365 XL. Don’t worry you’ll get a definitive answer on that question later on, but I had to include the X-Compact as a twist because not many people see how capable […]

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