Just Jerry Miculek Pushing out to 200 Yards with a Revolver

SEE Smith & Wesson 610 AT GUNS.COM FROM $836

Pro shooter and national treasure Jerry Miculek picks up a sweet new Smith & Wesson 610 to see if it can go the distance. The 200-yard distance, that is.

The big stainless steel 10mm N-Frame six-shooter just returned to production with Smith & Wesson earlier this year. In a nod to the cartridge’s recent embrace by a new generation of shooters, the company bills the 610-3 as having applications running from hunting to protection while venturing into the field in predator-heavy areas.

To test out its use at range, in the above video Miculek taps in a 6-inch model — the current offering includes guns in with both 4.5- and 6-inch barrels, which translate to a 9.5- and 12-inch overall length respectively — topped with a Vortex Venom red dot. The ammo is Hornady Critical Defense. He then proceeds to drill a three-round group that would be covered by a softball out to 100 yards, then doubles down and pumps those numbers up.

S&W's current generation of the Model 610 is a big N-Frame available in both 4.5- and 6-inch barrel configurations. (Photo: S&W)

Smith & Wesson’s current generation of the Model 610 is a big N-Frame available in both 4.5- and 6-inch barrel configurations. (Photo: Smith & Wesson)

First introduced in 1990, the 610 had a short initial run but has been a popular offering for competition shooters since then. Rebooted in 1998, the gun line closed again in 2005 but came back only briefly since then.

The DA/SA revolvers come standard with black synthetic finger groove grips, an adjustable rear sight with a white outline grips and an interchangeable black blade front sight. As both the 10mm and .40 S&W are rimless, the revolvers use six-shot moon clips, and three are included.

MSRP is set at $969 across the board, which comes in about $150 cheaper than Ruger‘s Super Redhawk 10mm while being on-par with their GP100 Match Champion in the same caliber.

SEE S&W 610 AT GUNS.COM FROM $836

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What is the National Firearms Act?

National Firearms Act tax stamp

$200 tax stamps are legally required to own most NFA-regulated items, such as suppressors. (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

The 1934 law that regulates many of the cooler items in the gun world, the National Firearms Act and its associated taxes raises many questions. Here are some answers.

How did the NFA make it into law?

Introduced into the 73rd Congress on May 28, 1934, as H.R. 9741 by U.S. Rep. Robert “Bob” Doughton, a North Carolina Democrat, the legislation sailed through Capitol Hill in less than a month. For historical perspective, the country was amid the Great Depression and lawmakers in the same Democrat-controlled Congress also sped the Securities Act, which established the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the National Industrial Recovery Act, which established the Public Works Administration, to the waiting hands of President Franklin Roosevelt for signature. The measure passed both chambers on a voice vote, with no record of which lawmakers approved it.

The bill that made it through Congress was watered down compared to other proposals at the time, such as HR 9066. Introduced by U.S. Rep. Hatton Sumners, D-TX, H.R. 9066 contained most of the same regulations and restrictions as the NFA but also targeted handguns and added a $5,000 yearly tax on firearm makers and importers. When adjusted for inflation, that figure would approach $100,000 today.

What does the NFA regulate?

While the new law did not outright ban the items under its control, it did require that shotguns and rifles with barrels less than 18 or 16 inches respectively in length, machine guns, firearm “mufflers and silencers” and firearms such as cane guns described as “any other weapons” be regulated and a tax established that was due whenever the device was made or transferred. Likewise, those who produced such items would have to pay a special occupational tax. The base price for most of these taxes was set at $200 per item, per transfer. This was the equivalent of about $3,800 in 2019 dollars.

As noted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which was originally part of the IRS until 1972, “The $200 making and transfer taxes on most NFA firearms were considered quite severe and adequate to carry out Congress’ purpose to discourage or eliminate transactions in these firearms.”

The amount of revenue paid into the U.S. Treasury has shifted over the years as, in general, the amount of tax has remained the same. In 1938, just $5,000 was collected. By 1984, $1.2 million was paid. In 2017, the ATF noted that just over $29 million was collected.

The NFA today

Today, the NFA controls the making and transfer of short-barreled rifles (SBR), short-barreled shotguns (SBS), silencers/suppressors, machine guns, AOWs, and destructive devices — with the latter something of a “catch-all” that includes everything from live grenades to anti-tank guns. Registration and tracking of such items are included in the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record, or NFRTR.

As of February 2018, over 5.5 million items were carried on the record:

AOW 60,706
Destructive Devices 2,818,528
Machine guns 638,260
Short Barreled Rifles 345,323
Short Barreled Shotguns 149,866
Suppressors 1,489,791

Has the NFA been challenged?

As with many controversial laws, the NFA has been the target of numerous legal challenges over its existence. This included the 1937 Sonzinsky case before the Supreme Court, which upheld the law as a valid exercise of the taxing power of Congress. More recently, the office of the current Solicitor General of the United States, Noel Francisco, used Sonzinsky in defense of the NFA in a challenge to the nation’s highest court in the case of a Kansas man found guilty of an NFA violation.

Jeremy Kettler in 2017 was found guilty of violating federal laws concerning the manufacturing and selling of suppressors and was given a year’s probation on a single count of possession of an unregistered NFA item. With the conviction upheld on appeal to the 10th U.S. Circuit last October. Aided by gun rights groups, Kettler appealed his case to the Supreme Court in January, arguing that the NFA is unconstitutional and that it is a money-losing tax that produces no effective revenue for the government while effectively criminalizing the devices it controls.

Francisco’s office in May told the court that Kettler’s petition should be denied, saying that it “lacked merit.” The Supreme Court declined to take up Kettler’s petition on June 10.

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Found on Guns.com: ATI GSG MP-40

The MP-40 is a classic military weapon developed by the Nazis and throughout the war served as a trophy for U.S. servicemen. They were only produced for a short period of time, from 1940-1945 but it’s estimated that over 1 million Mascinenpistole 40 were produced.

These days it’s extremely rare and expensive to own an authentic MP-40. You’ll likely have to pay $20,000 to $30,000 to get one authentic. In addition, you’ll also need the tax stamp and all the paperwork that goes with it. That’s why we’re ditching the authentic version to show you the ATI GSG MP-40.

German Sport Guns

Made in Germany by German Sport Guns (Photo: Don Summers)

German Sport Guns manufacturers the guns in Oesterweg so you still have some authentic Deutchland connection. ATI imports the MP-40 clones for sale stateside, but at a fraction of the cost of the real thing. It weighs in at 7.4 pounds unloaded, but just like the real thing this only aids in the accuracy.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $440

Just like the real thing this gun is chambered in 9mm and comes with one 25-round magazine. The one big notable difference between the two designs is that the ATI version lacks a stock, making it a pistol. Of course, you’re not going to get the famous full-auto either but at least you’ll save money on ammo. Speaking of, thank you to Aguila for providing ammo for this display.

All in all, this gun shot great and ate through all the Aguila we could feed it. It’s a fun gun, something to take to the range with your buddies and shoot all day. It’s an accurate gun and with the 9mm chambering it’s affordable to shoot as well.

ATI MP40

A classic look at a fraction of the original price (Photo: Don Summers/Guns.com)

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Select-Fire: Visiting Mark Serbu and His Tampa Factory

On this episode of Select-Fire, we visit with the eccentric and sometimes infamous Mark Serbu of Serbu Firearms. When he isn’t shooting machine guns out of airplanes or arguing with Seinfeld actors, he’s making cool guns and filling niche interests. So, we packed up our bags, carefully avoided Florida man, and ventured over to Serbu’s shop.

Mark Serbu

Mark Serbu inside his shop at Serbu Firearms. (Photo: Guns.com)

Serbu Super Shorty

If you know Serbu, you know the Super Shorty. (Photo: Guns.com)

Serbu

On the shelves inside Mark Serbu’s office library. (Photo: Guns.com)

Serbu Firearms

Mark Serbu, right, and Select-Fire’s host Chris Eger discussing a developing product — a rifle that weighs 70 pounds. (Photo: Guns.com)

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Bushmaster BA50: The Tale of a Chunky .50 Cal BMG Carbine

A rarely-seen carbine version of the Bushmaster BA50, with a factory 22-inch barrel, currently rests in the Guns.com Vault.

A rarely-seen carbine version of the Bushmaster BA50, with a factory 22-inch barrel, currently rests in the Guns.com Vault— and is looking for a good home.

SEE THIS BA50 AT GUNS.COM FROM $3450!

With roots in Kennesaw, Georgia, the Bushmaster BA50 has an interesting backstory that provides familiar AR-15 styling in a .50-caliber BMG rifle.

In early 2003, Georgia-based Cobb Manufacturing teased the market with a rifle, dubbed the Model 50A1, that used an AR-15 type gas operating system to shoot the 50 BMG round.  By that Fall, the gun had morphed to a bolt-action as the Cobb FA50(T) that kept many AR-style features.

Put into limited production, the final version of the gun produced by Cobb was the $7,000 BA50 which, as noted by the company in early 2007, was on the cover of tactical mags and in service with both law enforcement customers and “U.S. allies overseas.”

In August 2007, Bushmaster purchased Cobb and moved the company’s plant from Georgia to Maine and two years later the company put the upgraded BA50 into their catalog in both a rifle and carbine variant.

Bushmaster BA50 rifle Eger

The standard BA50, shown here at SHOT Show earlier this year with an AAC Cyclops suppressor, uses a 30-inch barrel. Contrast it with the carbine version at the top. (Photo: Chris Eger/Guns.com)

Using a Lothar Walther free-floating barrel with 1-in-15-inch rifling, the standard Bushmaster BA50 rifle carried a 30-inch example while the shorter carbine went just 22-inches. This 8-inch difference in barrel length trimmed 3-pounds from the 30-pound rifle when in the carbine configuration. Both models used an M1913 Picatinny top rail for optics and came standard with a 10-round magazine and bipod. The bolt is left-handed in operation but ejected to the right, allowing the user to keep their right hand on the pistol grip during the cycling process.

Like the AR-15, the BA-50 features an upper and lower receiver that opens on a forward pivot pin and includes a modified bolt carrier group while using a familiar AR-style safety with a manual thumb lever on the left side. The easy takedown also allowed the gun to be carried in two smaller components.

Bushmaster BA50 Carbine

There is a certain AR-15ish resemblance there, only on steroids.

The overall length of the Bushmaster BA50 rifle is 58-inches, while the carbine is a downright compact 50-inches. The perfect squirrel gun at just 27-pounds! This gun is available in the Guns.com Vault complete with a Pelican hard case and two 10-round magazines.

The overall length of the Bushmaster BA50 rifle is 58-inches, while the carbine is a downright compact 50-inches. The perfect squirrel gun at just 27-pounds! This gun is available in the Guns.com Vault complete with a Pelican hard case and two 10-round magazines.

With its Magpul PRS adjustable buttstock, multi-chamber muzzle brake, ErgoGrip pistol grip, and LimbSavr recoil pad, Bushmaster says felt the recoil of the BA50 is on par with a 12 gauge shotgun.

With its Magpul PRS adjustable buttstock, multi-chamber muzzle brake, ErgoGrip pistol grip, and LimbSavr recoil pad, Bushmaster says felt the recoil of the BA50 is on par with a 12 gauge shotgun.

While Bushmaster still makes the BA50 rifle, the carbine version was only produced for three years, going out of production in 2011. That makes the shorter BMG-chambered example shown above something of a collector’s item for less than a third of what a Barrett M107 semi-auto .50 will set you back.

SEE THIS BA50 AT GUNS.COM FROM $3450!

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Customs puts the Crimp on Banned Gun Parts from China

CBP officer holds gun parts

The items seized were worth some $378,000 and came into a California port in three shipments. (Photo: CBP)

U.S. Customs and Border Protection last week announced they had intercepted and seized 52,601 firearms parts in violation of the Chinese Arms Embargo. CBP detailed that the parts, worth an estimated $378,000, included sights, stocks, brakes, buffer kits, and grips that were shipped in three batches through the Los Angeles/Long Beach Seaport. While China legally exported boatloads of firearms to the U.S. in the 1980s, they are currently one of just eight countries barred from sending guns and ammunition to the country.

According to CBP, the parts included a mix of sights, stocks, muzzles, brakes, buffer kits, and grips (Photo: CBP)

According to CBP, the parts included a mix of sights, stocks, brakes, buffer kits, and grips (Photo: CBP)

“We work closely with our strategic partners to ensure import compliance while maintaining the highest standards of security at our nation’s largest seaport,” said LaFonda Sutton-Burke, CBP Port Director of the LA/Long Beach Seaport. “This interception underscores the successful collaboration between CBP officers, import specialists, and ATF investigators.”

The current ban on firearms from China was put into place in 1994 by then-President Bill Clinton. At the time, the country was reportedly the source of about one-third of all guns and more than half the rifles brought into the U.S. from overseas each year. The firearms prohibition by the Clinton administration came at the same time the White House renewed China’s “Most-Favored-Nation” status for trade privileges despite public outcry over Bejing’s policy of repression on human rights.

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The Secret to Hi-Point C9 Cleaning & Disassembly Revealed

GET THE C9 HERE FROM $139

Ohio-based Hi-Point has been delivering an assortment of pistols and carbines to the consumer market since 1994 but they can be somewhat difficult to clean and disassemble.

To give the word direct from the company, Mike Strassell, Hi-Point’s owner, goes for a deep dive on the inner workings of the C9 series 9mm pistol in the above 21-minute video. The instruction also helps those with a Hi-Point CF380 or CF380 Comp model as the full disassembly and assembly process is the same.

While not as easy as maintaining a modern revolver or something like, say a Glock, the job of breaking the C9 down to its component pieces isn’t rocket science. Strassell does point out that those electing to tackle the job need to start with an unloaded pistol, empty magazine, a variety of punches (3/32, 1/8, 1/16) a block, assorted screwdrivers, the adjustment tool that comes with the gun, and a small hammer.

As for cleaning once the handgun is disassembled, HI-Point notes in their recently updated user’s manual for the C380/C9 the following process:

BARREL: Clean the barrel as follows:
1. Wet a cleaning patch with a gun cleaning solvent or a cleaner-lubricant- preservative and run it through the barrel, from the chamber end, several times using a cleaning rod.

2. Wet a bristled cleaning brush with gun cleaning solvent or a cleaner-lubricant preservative and run it back and forth in the barrel, from the chamber end, using a cleaning rod.

3. Wet a new cleaning patch with gun oil or a cleaner-lubricant-preservative and run it through the barrel once, from the chamber end, with the cleaning rod and examine it. If it is not clean, repeat steps 2 and 3 until the patch remains clean after being run through the barrel.

4. Before firing your Hi-Point pistol, run a clean patch through the barrel, from the chamber end, using the cleaning rod. Repeat this procedure until the patch comes out of the barrel with no gun oil or cleaner-lubricant-preservative on it. (Note: If you will be storing your Hi-Point pistol, do not perform step 4 until you are ready to use it).

5. Wet a nylon bristle brush with gun cleaning solvent or a cleaner-lubricant-preservative and thoroughly brush the outside of the barrel to remove any dirt or residue.

6. Wipe the outside of the barrel dry with a clean patch and examine it. If it is not clean, repeat steps 5 and 6 until the patch remains clean.

SLIDE: Clean the slide as follows:

1. Wet a nylon bristle brush with gun cleaning solvent or a cleaner-lubricant-preservative and thoroughly brush the bottom surfaces where the slide sits on the frame.

2. Wipe the bottom surfaces where the slide sits on the frame with a clean patch and examine it. If it is not clean, repeat steps 1 and 2 until the patch remains clean.

3. Wet a nylon bristle brush with gun oil or a cleaner-lubricant-preservative and, while holding the slide with the muzzle end facing down, brush the breech face and the area under the extractor. Do not use solvents on hydro dipped coated surfaces.

4. While holding the slide with the muzzle end facing down, wipe the breech face with a clean patch and examine it. If it is not clean, repeat steps 3 and 4 until the patch remains clean.

5. Check all other exposed areas of the slide for cleanliness. If any dirt or debris is found, remove it with gun cleaning solvent or a cleaner-lubricant-preservative using a nylon bristle brush or a clean patch.

6. Wipe the exposed areas of the slide that you have cleaned in step 5 with a clean patch and examine it. If it is not clean, repeat steps 5 and 6 until the patch remains clean.

FRAME: Check the frame for cleanliness. If necessary, clean the frame as follows:

1. Wipe exposed parts of the frame with a clean patch that has been slightly dampened with gun cleaning solvent or a cleaner-lubricant- preservative.

2. Wipe the exposed areas of the frame with a clean patch and examine it. If it is not clean, repeat steps 1 and 2 until the patch remains clean.

MAGAZINE: Inspect the magazine for dirt or visible damage. If necessary, clean the magazine as follows:

1. Wipe the outside of the magazine and the feed lips with a clean patch that has been slightly dampened with gun cleaning solvent or a cleaner-lubricant-preservative.

2. Wipe the outside of the magazine and the feed lips with a clean patch and examine it. If it is not clean, repeat steps 1 and 2 until the patch remains clean.

After you have cleaned your Hi-Point pistol, lubricate it by slightly dampening a clean patch with gun oil or a cleaner-lubricant-preservative and wiping the outside of the barrel, the inside of the slide and the outside of the magazine.

Your Hi-Point pistol is designed to operate properly with only a small amount of lubrication. Do not over lubricate your Hi-Point pistol because too much lubricant can collect unburned powder and other debris and prevent your Hi-Point pistol from functioning properly.

After you have finished cleaning and lubricating your Hi-Point pistol, and before you assemble it, you should inspect the barrel for lead build-up, bulges, cracks or obstructions and inspect the frame and slide for any corrosion or any visible damage.

 

In the video on disassembly, when switching to assembly, Strassell warns on what parts not to adjust — such as the drop safety counterweight — and reiterates Hi-Point’s assurances that, should the user observe broken or damaged parts, the factory will “send out replacement parts for free.”

According to statistics by federal regulators, Hi-Point produced 14,805 semi-automatic .380-caliber pistols in 2017 along with another 31,210 chambered in 9mm, all backed up by a lifetime warranty.

The company made headlines across the greater gun community this year, first with their new 2nd generation C9 pistol, to be named the YC9 “Yeet Cannon” after the results of an online public poll. In celebration of the public outpouring, Hi-Point has also released a special version of the C9 dubbed the “Yeet Cannon G1.”

GET THE YEET CANNON HERE FROM $169

Yeet Cannon G1 C9 High Point

The original C9 is now considered by many to be the Gen 1 Yeet Cannon

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