Focused for hunting – The new Schmidt Bender 3-21×50 EXOS

The Schmidt & Bender hunting scope 3-21×50 Exos was introduced earlier this year, but are only now showing up. Apart from the introduction and description from the maker TFB have some really good pictures of the reticle from LongRange.sk. Below: Press picture from Schmidt & Bender. The 3-21×50 Exos has a second focal plane reticle […]

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TFB Round Table: 5 BEST 22 Magnum Rounds for Self-Defense and/or Hunting

22 magnumWelcome back to another edition of TFB’s Round Table sponsored by Ammunition To Go! For those who are first joining us, this is a multi-part series where TFB will discuss the characteristics of great ammunition for specific applications. This could vary from big game hunting, plinking, precision rifle matches, small game hunting, or even pistol competitions. Chances are there is someone here at TFB […]

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Just Jerry Miculek Pushing out to 200 Yards with a Revolver

SEE Smith & Wesson 610 AT GUNS.COM FROM $836

Pro shooter and national treasure Jerry Miculek picks up a sweet new Smith & Wesson 610 to see if it can go the distance. The 200-yard distance, that is.

The big stainless steel 10mm N-Frame six-shooter just returned to production with Smith & Wesson earlier this year. In a nod to the cartridge’s recent embrace by a new generation of shooters, the company bills the 610-3 as having applications running from hunting to protection while venturing into the field in predator-heavy areas.

To test out its use at range, in the above video Miculek taps in a 6-inch model — the current offering includes guns in with both 4.5- and 6-inch barrels, which translate to a 9.5- and 12-inch overall length respectively — topped with a Vortex Venom red dot. The ammo is Hornady Critical Defense. He then proceeds to drill a three-round group that would be covered by a softball out to 100 yards, then doubles down and pumps those numbers up.

S&W's current generation of the Model 610 is a big N-Frame available in both 4.5- and 6-inch barrel configurations. (Photo: S&W)

Smith & Wesson’s current generation of the Model 610 is a big N-Frame available in both 4.5- and 6-inch barrel configurations. (Photo: Smith & Wesson)

First introduced in 1990, the 610 had a short initial run but has been a popular offering for competition shooters since then. Rebooted in 1998, the gun line closed again in 2005 but came back only briefly since then.

The DA/SA revolvers come standard with black synthetic finger groove grips, an adjustable rear sight with a white outline grips and an interchangeable black blade front sight. As both the 10mm and .40 S&W are rimless, the revolvers use six-shot moon clips, and three are included.

MSRP is set at $969 across the board, which comes in about $150 cheaper than Ruger‘s Super Redhawk 10mm while being on-par with their GP100 Match Champion in the same caliber.

SEE S&W 610 AT GUNS.COM FROM $836

The post Just Jerry Miculek Pushing out to 200 Yards with a Revolver appeared first on Guns.com.

CZ Touts New All-American Single Trap, CZ 1012 Semi-Auto Shotguns

SHOP A WIDE RANGE OF CZ SHOTGUNS HERE!

CZ-USA this month upped the ante on their scattergun game by announcing the new All-American Single Trap and a whole series of CZ 1012 semi-auto shotguns.

The Single Trap is an upgrade of CZ’s legacy All-American Single to include redesigned CNC internals and replaceable hinge pins. Available in 30-, 32-, and 34-inch single-barrel models, the series uses ported barrels with a lengthened forcing cone. The Turkish walnut stock with laser checkering features a four-way adjustable parallel comb and a variable length of pull while the trigger reach itself can be tuned as well.

Overall length of the All-American Single Trap, with the 30-inch barrel fitted, is 48-inches while the average weight is 8.5-pounds. Besides an adjustable stock, toe-in/toe-out modifications can be made to the butt pad. (Photo: CZ)

The overall length of the All-American Single Trap, with the 30-inch barrel fitted, is 48-inches while the average weight is 8.5-pounds. Besides an adjustable stock, toe-in/toe-out modifications can be made to the butt pad. (Photo: CZ)

The 12-gauge clays gun ships with five extended chokes and has an MSRP of $1,369.

CZ 1012 Semi-Autos

CZ bills their new 1012 series shotguns as something of a “do-it-all” platform that can fill the needs of upland or waterfowl hunters as well as recreational target shooters.

Using a gas-less spring bolt operating system, CZ says the 1012s run cleaner and more reliably than contemporary semi-auto shotguns on the consumer market.

“During extensive testing of this system by CZ engineers and designers, 5,000 shells were fired through several CZ 1012s, without a drop of oil or cleaning of any sort being done. Results? Zero parts breakage or malfunctions,” says the company in their literature on the shotgun.

CZ has five initial models of the 12 gauge 1012 headed to the market, all with 28-inch vent ribbed barrels with a 3-inch chamber and a 4+1 magazine tube. Overall length is 49 inches while average weight is a handy 6.5-pounds, which should have a broad appeal to a diverse range of sportsmen.

All have a cross-bolt safety and 14.5-inch length-of-pull. Each shotgun ships with five extended chokes with an MSRP ranging from $659 to $749 depending on the model.

CZ 1012 Shotgun Black Receiver

The CZ 1012 shotgun with black receiver and Turkish walnut furniture has a $659 MSRP (Photos: CZ)

CZ 1012 Shotgun Synthetic

CZ 1012 synthetic, $659

CZ 1012 synthetic camo with a Mossy Oaks Blades pattern, $749 MSRP

CZ 1012 synthetic camo with a Mossy Oaks Blades pattern, $749 MSRP

CZ 1012 Shotgun Bronze Receiver

CZ 1012 shotgun, bronze receiver, $659

CZ 1012 Shotgun Grey Receiver

CZ 1012 shotgun, grey receiver, $659

SHOP A WIDE RANGE OF CZ SHOTGUNS HERE!

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How to Zero a Riflescope at 100 Yards

Zeroing a rifle is best accomplished with a rest. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

You’ve chosen your riflescope, and whether the rifle is a small caliber or a bigger bore centerfire, the process of zeroing the scope need not be a dreaded one. Even if you intend to shoot long distance, starting with a 100-yard zero is the basis for everything going forward. In fact, with these simple steps, getting that scope dialed in and punching out bullseyes at football field distances is quite simple.

Step 1: Know Your Riflescope

Range time is made much easier when you’re familiar with your riflescope. Take time to learn about the scope itself, as well as the type of reticle. Is it MOA or MIL? That will affect the units of measure to which the scope adjusts as you turn the turrets. How far you adjust depends upon the individual scope, though most clicks will equal one-quarter-inch at 100 yards on the more common civilian MOA riflescopes. Understanding your specific scope’s limits, measurements and functions will ultimately lead to a more efficient time at the range with less frustration.

Step 2: Mount and Level the Optic

Whether you do this at home or have the local gun shop mount your riflescopes, the importance of mounting details will set the stage for your accuracy and success down the road. In short, don’t speed through this step. Start with quality mounts rather than choosing the cheapest available, especially for larger calibers that will face the shock of heavier recoil.

Ensure that the riflescope is mounted level and also torqued to the correct factory-recommended settings using an appropriate torque wrench. Most shops will do this for you when you purchase the scope.

Understanding the riflescope and its operations will help the zero process. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)

Step 3: Boresight

After mounting the optic, whether at home or by a gun shop, the next step in the sighting process is to perform a boresighting job. Boresighting simply means that you’re ensuring the scope is aligned with the barrel and iron sights. It’s not only quick and painless, but usually comes included if a shop is mounting the scope for you; however, if you’re DIYing, you’ll need a few simple tools like a laser or manual muzzle insert to complete the task.

This will give you the best start on the range, meaning you’ll most likely ping paper at 50 yards. If you don’t have access to boresighting tools, you can skip this step, but it means you’ll have to start even closer for the next step to save both ammo and frustration.

Step 4: Start Close

Because these will be the first shots since the riflescope has been mounted, it’s best to start close so as to expedite the process. Even the best boresighting job does not guarantee the rifle will be directly on target, especially at 100-yards. 50-yards is the most common distance to begin zeroing the rifle on the range.

Take three shots from a solid rest and assess the target. Make major adjustments at this distance instead of going directly to greater distance. Just remember that if four clicks equal one inch at 100-yards, be aware closer ranges multiply the changes, so in that case, eight clicks would make the same adjustment at 50-yards. Once you’ve got clean groupings on target at 50-yards move on to the final step.

Step 5: Make Final Adjustments at 100 Yards

Now that you know the exact point of impact at 50-yards and are familiar with making adjustments to the optic, it’s time to swing out to the 100-yard target. While many folks claim you can adequately zero with a single shot, there is too much potential for fluke and error.  Shoot a three-shot group before making any adjustments.

While practicing as you plan to hunt or shoot is always the best practice, sighting in the rifle from a solid rest so as to remove the human error element is a good starting point. Some hunters, using a simple duplex reticle, will opt to keep that three-shot group an inch or two high at 100 yards instead of shooting dead center in order to better prepare for 200-plus yard shots.

After initial zero is achieved, have fun plinking! (Photo: Guns.com)

Step 6: Have Fun Shooting

Once you’re confident with where the rifle—and you—are shooting, you’re all set. Don’t forget though, zeroing the scope is just the beginning. Practice is where everything comes together.

Be sure to check out Guns.com’s inventory of rifles perfect for scoped shooting. 

The post How to Zero a Riflescope at 100 Yards appeared first on Guns.com.

Mossberg adds 6.5 PRC, 350 Legend to Patriot Series rifles

When it comes to their 6.5 PRC-chambered Patriot rifles, Mossberg uses a standard contour, free-floating 24-inch barrel with a 1:8 twist rate, straight-edge fluting and 5/8”- 24TPI muzzle threads. Shown here on an FDE model. https://www.guns.com/firearms/rifles/bolt-action/patriot-predator (Photo: Mossberg)

When it comes to their 6.5 PRC-chambered Patriot rifles, Mossberg uses a standard contour, free-floating 24-inch barrel with a 1:8 twist rate, straight-edge fluting and 5/8”- 24TPI muzzle threads. Shown here on an FDE model. (Photo: Mossberg)

SEE MOSSBERG PATRIOTS AT GUNS.COM FROM $318

Mossberg this week announced new Patriot series bolt-action rifles chambered for the increasingly popular 6.5 Precision Rifle Cartridge and .350 Legend.

When it comes to 6.5 PRC, two new rifles in the Patriot Predator line for those looking to extend their range. The spicy new round– described as the “big brother” to the 6.5 Creedmoor— was introduced by Hornady in 2018 to scratch a new itch for those wanting to push out beyond 1,000 yards and has seen numerous gun makers move to produce rifles to accommodate it.

Mossberg’s Patriot Predator 6.5 PRCs both sport a 24-inch fluted and threaded barrel that, when coupled with a synthetic stock, keeps the 44.25-inch rifles at about 7-pounds. Shipping standard with a Picatinny scope base/rail, they have a 4+1 round magazine capacity. The difference between the two models is in the finish, with one available with a matte blue barrel and FDE stock while the other option has a Patriot Brown Cerakote finish on the metal surfaces and a True Timber Strata pattern stock.

Mossberg's Patriot Predator 6.5 PRC with a Patriot Brown Cerakote finished barrel and True Timber Strata pattern stock. (Photo: Mossberg)

Mossberg’s Patriot Predator 6.5 PRC with a Patriot Brown Cerakote finished barrel and True Timber Strata pattern stock. (Photo: Mossberg)

MSRP is $441 for the more basic FDE model, while the Patriot/True Timber finished variant retails for $524.

All Patriot series rifles include such standard features as Mossberg’s LBA user-adjustable trigger with a 2- to 7-pound range of adjustment, a spiral-fluted bolt with a checkered bolt handle and sling swivel studs.

350 Legend Models

Patriot Synth Matte 350Legend Scoped

The standard contour 22-inch carbon steel barrel on all the new Mossberg Patriot series bolt-action rifles in .350 Legend is free-floating, features a 1:16 twist rate and matte blue finish, shown here on a standard Patriot Synthetic model. (Photo: Mossberg)

Deer hunters in “straight-wall-cartridge-compliant” deer-hunting states will now have the option of going Mossberg when it comes to the new .350 Legend chambering. Introduced last year by Winchester to capitalize on the trend that has seen new rounds such as the .450 Bushmaster grow in popularity in the past few years, the cartridge maker contends the Legend offers a flatter trajectory and better terminal performance over their competitors while remaining compliant in most states.

Mossberg’s recently announced Legend-chambered bolt-action rifles include a Patriot Synthetic Super Bantam in both a standard and scoped combo package and a Patriot Synthetic that is also offered in a scoped package. All use a 22-inch fluted matte blue finished barrel with black synthetic furniture.

The Patriot Synthetic Super Bantam models use a variable length-of-pull stock that varies from 12 to 13-inches for better use by small-statured shooters, while the Patriot Synthetic series guns have what Mossberg calls a “classic-style” non-adjustable stock. On the scoped packages, the optic is a 3×9-40mm

Pitched to youth, the Patriot Synthetic Super Bantam allows the user to add spacers to increase the LOP from 12 to 13 inches as they grow or simply to allow a smaller-statured user to customize their fit. An optional 3x9-40mm scope package is offered with Weaver-style bases. (Photo: Mossberg)

Pitched to youth, the Patriot Synthetic Super Bantam allows the user to add spacers to increase the LOP from 12 to 13 inches as they grow or simply to allow a smaller-stature user to customize their fit. An optional 3×9-40mm scope package is offered with Weaver-style bases. (Photo: Mossberg)

MSRP ranges from $396 to $435 depending on model and package.

SEE MOSSBERG PATRIOTS AT GUNS.COM FROM $318

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New Savage 110 Prairie Hunter Bolt-Action 224 Valkyrie

Savage has just launched its new Model 110 Prairie Hunter, a precision bolt-action 110 platform rifle built for the cartridge that bent the rules of ballistics when it was introduced in 2017. This is the new configuration of their older Model 110 first released in 1958. Model 110 Features Bolt-action 224 Valkyrie Cartridge offers the […]

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