TFB Review: Two-Point, Fast Adjustment Rifle Sling From S2 Delta

S2 Delta Fast Adjustment SlingThe guys over at S2 Delta gave me an opportunity to test out their two-point, fast adjustment rifle sling.  The sling they sent was their padded version with a quick detach sling swivel.  This was my first jaunt into fast adjust sling territory and I was glad for the chance to try one out. TFB […]

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The Beretta M9 Strong Even in Retirement

The Beretta M9 was the standard side arm for the U.S. military for more than 30 years only to be recently retired by a more modern duty weapon design. The M9 has not only withstood the test of time in the hands of our troops, but also here state’s side with various law enforcement agencies as well. With the current trend of duty weapons shifting away, though, it makes me wonder: what’s the Beretta M9’s place in today’s marketplace?

We already know that the M9 is reliable. You cannot spend three decades as a military sidearm fighting in deserts, on mountain tops, and everything in between only to be deemed unreliable. The M9’s open slide design works to its advantage by not trapping spent brass or dirt in the action. The most common malfunction you may run into would be a failure-to-fire but even that is mitigated by the M9’s strong single- and double-action hammer. This is a gun that will not quit on you with minimal maintenance required.

M9

The M9 has not only withstood the test of time in the hands of our troops, but also here state’s side with various law enforcement agencies as well. With the current trend of duty weapons shifting away, though, it makes me wonder: what’s the Beretta M9’s place in today’s marketplace? (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

You will be hard pressed to find a more comfortable shooting handgun than the M9 straight from the manufacturer. This is a full size “fighting handgun” with a nice high beaver tail to allow for a very aggressive grip. Unloaded the M9 weighs 33 ounces, which is heavy and probably not the best choice for concealed carry, but it aids in keeping felt recoil to a minimum. Once the M9 is out of the holster it shoots like a calm lake.

During a 40-year period a gun can develop a lot of aftermarket support. The M9 has an extensive supply of aftermarket parts, holsters, mags, etc. Some of this support is military surplus from extensive service life and some is from the cult like following Beretta has developed over the years. I will say that if you are buying from the surplus market that a lot of the parts and pieces have been well loved. Make sure you do your homework when buying and if you can physically inspect the components that is even better.

M9

You will be hard pressed to find a more comfortable shooting handgun than the M9 straight from the manufacturer. This is a full size “fighting handgun” with a nice high beaver tail to allow for a very aggressive grip. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

Thank you to Ammunition To Go for the quality ammo supplied in this review.

Some would consider retirement a death sentence, but others might consider it a time to re-invent themselves. The M9 is still the same great gun that has been carried by our military for three decades. It will need to find a bigger role on the civilian market and I think it really is starting too. There are plenty of gunsmiths out there boosting the popularity of the M9 by tuning them up for competition and concealed carry. For those out there that want to start messing around with a great SA/DA gun or breathe new life into a military classic, the M9 is one of my top choices for you.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $418

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Found on Guns.com: Rock Island Armory M1911

Rock Island Armory makes affordable 1911s, one of the greatest designs in firearm history. While true believers tend to go after the standard .45 ACP models, Rock Island breaks the mold and offers a 9mm variant as well. The smaller chambering coupled with the sturdy design makes for an affordable training pistol or manageable beginner gun.

With 1911s, you can find models in just about any price range, but for a practical gun like this, Rock Island priced it at a working man’s wage. While just a fraction of what some 1911s retail, this Rock Island 1911 has a performance comparable to those three or four times the price.

The Rock Island 1911 features a fixed front sight with a dovetail rear and a parkerized finish with wooden grip panels that give the gun a classic look. On the range, this model ate through all the Aguila 9mm I could feed it. I personally own one and would recommend this Rock Island version to any beginner who is looking to break into the 1911 platform.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $300

Check the variety of Rock Island Armory 1911 pistols on Guns.com. For other great handguns, rifles, shotguns, check out the Guns.com Vault and collection of Certified Used Guns.

The post Found on Guns.com: Rock Island Armory M1911 appeared first on Guns.com.

TFB Book Review: The Custom Revolver by Hamilton Bowen

The Custom Revolver Cover. Kindle Edition. CroppedThe Custom Revolver likely is not a new title to most of TFB readers, as it is a classic published almost 20 years ago. In its hardcover form, it quickly went out of stock and its qualities and rarity made it a collectible. It may seem an odd choice to review such a dated, albeit […]

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TFB Review: Universal Holster from Phalanx Defense Systems. Who needs a universal holster anyway?

Many people cringe when they hear the term “universal holster”. I understand why, and frankly, for years I had exactly the same opinion. I thought that the holster is either good or universal, but never both. And turns out I was completely wrong. As with most people, my first experience with universal holsters was horrible. […]

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Popular Rifle Builds for Cloners

Maybe you have heard of a group of individuals in the firearms community known as “cloners.” Cloners build rifles that resemble actual service rifles. Sometimes these clone rifles very accurately represent the actual platform. Each component is carefully selected to build the most authentic looking rifle. Other times they are simply an informal example of an actual military rifle and are just an inspiration for a unique project. It all depends on the cloner’s end goal.

The three most common clones are the M4, MK12, and MK18. These frequently copied models have not only been used in recent wars but are also seen frequently in the entertainment industry such as movies and TV shows. All are proven platforms with their own iconic look and characteristics. It is not all for show though. The military have designed these platforms to fulfill specific roles.

cloners

These frequently copied models have not only been used in recent wars but are also seen frequently in the entertainment industry such as movies and TV shows. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

The M4 needs no introduction. This is a standard issue service rifle for many soldiers and the model has gone through a number of reiterations. Branches of the military have elected to choose a variety of their own parts such as stocks, fore-ends, lights, lasers, etc. but for the most part the M4 is traditionally built on a Colt receiver with a 14.5-inch barrel and fixed front sight post. Iron sights, red dot (Aimpoint or EOTech) or ACOG will usually be the sighting system on top. This is a rifle that can fill almost any role and is a good beginner project for a first-time cloner.
SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $1,050

cloners

For some cloning is a challenge to build a rifle that is exactly to spec but for others it is a fun way to remember our history and maybe put their own personal twist on it. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

Sometimes you want a rile with precision. The MK12 Special Purpose Rifle (SPR) was designed to be more effective at further distances. This rifle chambered in 5.56 is often cloned but does use some unique parts that may require some in depth searching if you want an accurate clone. It has gone through a number of variations but usually you will find these tack drivers with 2.5-10x variable scopes, 18-inch free floated barrels that sit under a 12-inch handguard. A great place to source MK12 components is from Precision Reflex Inc.
SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $2,054

cloners

All are proven platforms with their own iconic look and characteristics. It is not all for show though. The military have designed these platforms to fulfill specific roles. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

The most popular of the three clones right now is the MK18 chambered in 5.56. Since the MK18 uses a 10.3-inch barrel you will find clones that are in “pistol” form but if you are looking to be as authentic as possible then you will need to build an SBR. A Daniel Defense MK18 is a pretty easy way to knock out a large portion of a MK18 clone. These guns were originally desired for “close quarter battle (CQB)” but have also been found in other roles because of their compact size. These shorties receive a lot of publicity due to a large portion of the Special Operations Community using them.
SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $1,796

For some cloning is a challenge to build a rifle that is exactly to spec but for others it is a fun way to remember our history and maybe put their own personal twist on it. I would recommend if you start a clone build to not get wrapped up in the specifics of every piece. Some of these components can be extremely rare and take years to find. Above all else, have fun with it and build something you will enjoy shooting.

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Gun Review: Kriss Sphinx

I’ll be honest with you. I have had the opportunity to shoot the Kriss Sphinx on multiple occasions over the last six years. It’s an outstanding handgun. The newest 9mm compact version I recently had the chance to handle continued to exceed my level of expectations. You will not hear from me that the Sphinx’s $1,000 price point is not justified or that it is just a glorified CZ. Compared to other “production handguns,” the Sphinx has pound for pound some of the best craftsmanship available.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $818.43

Kriss Sphinx

The construction of the Kriss Sphinx has a level of excellence that you may find in a custom shop, but most likely not out of any other factory. Both the slide and upper portion of the frame are precision machined from a solid piece of billet material. As if that was not good enough, Kriss decided to finish off the slide and frame by hand fitting them together. This ensures tight tolerances and strength between the frame and slide.

From a distance the Sphinx looks like a double/single action hammer fired CZ of some type. Let us take a closer look how it operates. The rails of the slide ride inside of the frame allowing for a smooth action and a low bore axis. The mechanics of this make recoil an after thought. Inside the handgun all the internals are polished. This improves reliability and makes the action on the trigger smooth like a calm lake.

Kriss Sphinx

You will not hear from me that the Sphinx’s $1,000 price point is not justified or that it is just a glorified CZ. Compared to other “production handguns,” the Sphinx has pound for pound some of the best craftsmanship available. (Photo: Ben Brown/Guns.com)

I think CZ’s have some of the best ergo’s when talking about handguns. So it would make sense that the Sphinx which is based off the design of the CZ 75 would have that same great feel in the hands. Only I think Sphinx feels better! The high beaver tail and the swap-able rubberized grip panels provide an excellent foundation for a variety of hand sizes. This 28 ounce handgun is on the heavy side, but shoots like a dream!

Kriss did not skimp on the accessories for the Sphinx either. It comes in a hard case with custom cut foam to hold the gun, two 15 round mags, three different size grip panels, cleaning kit, and mag loader. Kriss also provides the customer with options to add a threaded barrel (1/2×28 thread pitch) and 6 different cerakote colors to choose from. You can certainly tell that Kriss went the extra mile to deliver the finished product to the end user.

Final Thoughts

It will be hard for another hammer fired handgun to take the place of the Sphinx as my favorite. Other shooters have compared it to a well built Swiss watch, not only because of its origins but because its craftsmanship is very evident when shooting it. Although maybe a bit large for concealed carry, the Sphinx will delivers the goods when it comes to a high performance handgun.

SEE AT GUNS.COM FROM $818.43

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